Why you need an NDA!

You might have realised our NDA is free on our website http://www.lenoma.co.za (direct link is here Basic NDA.)

But what’s the big deal about NDAs so how do you use it or for what is it for exactly and how it’ll benefit you?

There are many benefits and advantages for using an NDA:

1) The most obvious advantage of an NDA is protecting your information!

An NDA agreement allows you to agree on what information can and cannot be disclosed to others;

what each party’s obligations are in regards to the confidential information;

and how information is dealt with upon termination of the NDA.

2) An NDA agreement can allow parties to define what “confidential information” is, so that it is clear to both parties throughout their relationship what is considered confidential and what subsequently cannot be disclosed.

What type of information can be considered ‘confidential’ is endless, and it can include anything from patent ideas, test scores, employee information, passwords etc.

Setting out what is included as confidential information can save a lot of time in the event a dispute arises and a lawsuit is brought, as the judge can see whether the information disclosed is specifically listed or described in the NDA.

Drafters of the NDA can be as precise as they wish when defining what is confidential in their agreement by including an exhaustive list of specific items.

Others will want a broader, non-exhaustive list which may include language such as “all information disclosed in the course of fulfilling the purpose of the agreement”.

Drafters can also include exceptions to the prohibitions on disclosure such as information that is generally available to the public;

information obtained by a third party who is not bound by any confidentiality agreements;

where information is trivial;

information developed for the recipient independently;

information disclosed through no fault of the recipient party and information that was already known by the party before signing the NDA.

These exceptions are common in NDAs.

3) A well-drafted NDA will outline the consequences for those that breach the NDA, which will likely include a hefty monetary fine.

The party that breached the NDA can also be subject to a court order preventing them from continuing to disclose any confidential information that was protected by the NDA.

4) An NDA assures parties that information will remain confidential, and can include survival provisions requiring the party to not disclose the confidential information for a stated time period (eg. 2 years) after their relationship has ended.

Takeaways

– If you are considering a business deal, try to have the other party review and sign an NDA before entering into business discussions and possibly exchanging confidential information. The sooner the better!

– Pay close attention to the definition of confidential information before signing an NDA, so you are clear what information (of yours) is protected, and what information (of the other party) cannot be disclosed to others.

Hope this helps you in your business journey!

Team Lenoma Legal

http://www.lenoma.co.za

5 contract clauses in any Legal Agreement you should look into.

Here are 5 basic contract sections that you should review carefully before signing the contract.

1. The parties to the contract.

This section of the contract is important because it tells you who they are entering into an agreement with.

– Is it another person or several people? Is it a business?

– Are you signing the contract on behalf of their business or in an individual capacity?

Are the names of all parties spelled correctly?

2. The “money” terms.

This section of the contract is important because it deals with the money.

Does it clearly lay out how much a good or service will cost?

When, how much, and how long will you have to pay the other party or will the other party have to pay?

3. Jurisdiction and Governing Law.

This section of the contract explains what law applies to the contract and the location where a dispute must be brought if there is a disagreement

Jurisdictions or countries may have different laws, so knowing which law applies to your contract is critical to understanding your rights.

4. Attorney’s Fees.

Some contracts have a section that states that a losing party in a dispute has to pay the winning party’s attorney’s fees and costs. This is an important section to you because you may be able to get their attorney’s fees reimbursed if a dispute arises out of the contract and you win.

5. Signature page.

This section of the contract is so obvious that it often gets overlooked.

Did all of the parties sign the contract?

These are just a few of the sections that your potential client should carefully review prior to signing a contract. However, every section of a contract is important.

If the contract is still confusing to you, at least they still have you to review it with us or any of our partner law firms.

Get a copy any business agreement here at Lenoma Legal eShop.

Free Basic NDA up for grabs!

So you not sure how this legal document download thing works?

Try this out, download this NDA, find out for yourself how it works.

Not only will you be getting an updated legally binding NDA, you will also get to see our work.

Here’s the link Basic NDA

We offer more legal documents here http://www.lenoma.co.za

Share, this link, tell a friend!

Cleaner, Simpler and Faster

In an effort to create better user experience for our clients. We have cleaned up your platform for you.

Documents are now easier to find and all have standardized pricing to suit your needs.

AS part of our after care, once you have accessed your documents and paid for it, you will receive 1 complimentary consultation with a lawyer to help you navigate through the details.

Do go grab yourself a legal documents here www.lenoma.co.za/shop

Go grab a copy try us out TODAY.

Team Lenoma Legal

 

 

Commercial Leases 

If you own a business, chances are you may need to consider entering into a commercial lease. So how do these differ from ordinary, residential leases?

There are a number of things you need to look out for. This article will cover the four most important things to look out for before signing the dotted line.

1 . Terms of the Lease and Options

The term of the lease is extremely important for business tenants. There often exists a conflict of interest between landlords and tenants with regard to the terms of leases so it is important to be informed and look out for your best interests.

Generally, landlords prefer the security of a longer term lease (for example, 5 or 10 years), whereas tenants usually prefer the flexibility afforded by a shorter lease (3 years is about standard). This is especially the case for start-up business tenants who commonly either go out of business or rapidly expand and require a new lease to expand operations in the near future. Keep in mind that, as mentioned, if the relevant retail lease legislation applies to your lease, there may be restrictions upon the minimum term of your lease.

Another important consideration is whether the lease provides you with an option to renew at the end of the initial term so you have the option to continue trading. This is very important for commercial leases as a large proportion of your businesses’ goodwill may be attached to your premises, so you may want to protect this.

2. Rent and Security

The rent clause is probably the most obviously important aspect of any lease agreement. When it comes to paying out expenses, we all want to keep it to a minimum! The rent clause specifies the the amount of money the tenant must pay to the landlord in return for the landlord providing the use and occupation of the property. Rent is a significant operating expense for most businesses.

The rent for the initial term, as well as any changes to the rent, must be specified in the lease. The most common methods of rent review (i.e. changes in rent) are consumer price index (CPI), fixed percentage increase and market rent. It is important to ensure you will be able to afford any proposed rent increases during the period of your lease and any renewal period to avoid falling behind.

The landlord may also request a security payment from the tenant to protect against the tenant failing to pay rent (i.e. defaulting). This would either be in the form of a bank guarantee by an individual tenant, or a personal guarantee by a company tenant’s directors. The security deposit can be a significant amount of money, usually equal to three to six months’ rent. Therefore, you shouldn’t forget this cost when assessing the affordability of your commercial lease.

3. Termination

Lastly, you should also review the termination clause contained in your commercial lease. Keep an eye out for any clause which allows the landlord to terminate the lease before the end of the term. In most cases, it is highly advised that you seek to have this removed as it causes uncertainty of your lease which can be very damaging for your business. Further, you should be aware of any other circumstances which will cause your lease to be terminated.

Get Advice from a Professional

There are clearly some very important things to look out for when entering a commercial lease for your business.

Each of these factors has the potential to have a major impact on the performance of your business, so it is worth looking into obtaining independent legal advice to protect your best interests. As a potential tenant, if you are unhappy with any aspect of your lease agreement, you should negotiate with your landlord to reach an agreement that suits your needs.

The benefits of becoming a contractor

There are many advantages to an employment relationship, but since an Independent Contractors Agreement is our #docoftheweek we thought it would be great to deal with some of the advantages of being in a contractor agreement relationship.

The main advantages are that you can:

  • Become your own boss

    Contract work provides greater independence and, for many people, a greater perceived level of job security than traditional employment.

  • Maintain a good work/life balance

    Less commuting, fewer meetings, less office politics – and you can work the hours that suit you and your lifestyle best.

  • Earn more money

    Being a contractor means you get paid for every hour of work you do, at the market rate. If your skills are in demand, your income could be high.

  • Test out a new field of expertise

    Not sure if there’s a market for your skills? You can dip a toe into a new industry without committing yourself to a full-time job. If it doesn’t work out, you can cut your losses quickly and easily.

  • Start on a part-time basis

    This can be appealing to young people just graduating from college, or older people who want to experiment with a second or even third career.

  • Test out a company

    If you’re not sure a new company is offering the right full-time employment opportunity for you, suggest first working for them as an independent contractor.

 

If you would want an #IndependentContractorsAgreement get yours here at Lenoma Legal eCommerce website

 

Employee vs Independent Contractor. Whats the difference, though?

Difference between independent contractor & employee

Ever wondered what is the big fuss around the difference between employees and independent contractors?

The main difference between employee and Independent contractor is the nature of the contract itself.

It must be determined what the intention was of the parties to the contract – was the intention that it actually be a contract of employment, or was the intention that it actually be an Independent contractor relationship ?

Employment Contract:

The one contract (employee/employer relationship) is a Contract of Service – the employee undertakes to render his services (as opposed to an agreement to undertake and complete specific tasks) to the employer, usually for an undetermined or understated period of time, in return for which the employer undertakes to pay the employee for those services.

In the Contract of Service (employee contract) the employee is subject to the control and direction of the employer, the employer stipulates what hours the employee shall work, the employer dictates how and when the various tasks shall be performed, the employer provides all the resources to enable those tasks or services to be performed.

The employee is obliged, in terms of the contract, to obey the employer’s instructions and direction is in regard of all the above. In the Contract for Service, the “employer” may dictate a certain date by which the agreed task must be completed, but he would not, for example, be able to instruct the contractor regarding what materials must be used and how the job is to be done.

employee-contractor

employees or contractors? The intention of the parties is KEY!

 

Independent Contract:

The other contract (Independent contractor) is a Contract for Service, and is usually a contract where the contractor  undertakes to perform a specific service or task, and upon completion of the agreed service or task, or upon production of the result agreed upon, the contractor will be paid.

For example, you would enter into a Contract for Service with a person to  paint your house. You would instruct that person regarding what colours you required the house to be painted in, and you would probably stipulate a date by which the job should be completed. You would not, however, instruct the contractor regarding what size paint brushes he must use, or where he should use paint brushes or paint rollers, or what brand of paint to use, and so on. That would be for the contractor  to decide.

The contractor would be free to decide who he seems to your house to carry out the painting, and the would be free to take on painting jobs for other people – even jobs for other people with whom you may have a problem. The Contractor would also decide for himself whether he is going to attend to painting your house every day of the week for the next three weeks, or whether he will attend to your job on only two days of the week or three days of the week, he would regulate how many workers he desires to put on the job, how much he will pay them, and when he will pay them.

The “contractor” would not be free to engage in work for other companies, including companies in opposition to you, he would not be free to regulate his own working hours or days of work, he would not be free to send other people to your premises to carry out the tasks that he is contracted to carry out, and so on.

A Restraint of Trade clause can never be inserted in a true Independent Contractor agreement – it is quite simply unenforceable. You cannot restrain your painter or electrician from taking on other work, or from the painting the buildings of companies in opposition to you. Thus, if you wish the nature of the contract to be that of a true Independent contractor, you cannot put in a Restraint of Trade clause.

For this week, we have INDEPENDENT CONTRACTORS AGREEMENT as #DocofTheWeek, need a valid one?

Get yours here from our legal e-commerce site. http://www.lenoma.co.za/product/independent-contractors-agreement/

Not sure this is for you? contact us on info@lenoma.co.za to schedule a legal consultation for only R450 for 30 minutes TODAY.